Reisetomate Tomato

Solanum lycopersicum
50 Seeds/pkt
Reisetomate Tomato (indeterminate) 50+ seeds Fruit heirloom garden vegetable
  • Climbing (indeterminate)
  • Unusual lumpy fruit
  • Known as the 'Travelers Tomato'
Reisetomate Tomato is a climbing (indeterminate) variety. Known as the lumpy travelers tomato this unusual tomato forms clusters of joined tomato segments. Originating from Peru it was popular among travelers for its ability to be eaten by segment as required. Sweet acidic flavour with a thick skin. Great for chutney, salsa, salads and snacking.

$2.75 inc GST

$2.75 inc GST

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Product Description
Planting Guide

Product Description

Reisetomate Tomato (indeterminate) 50+ seeds Fruit heirloom garden vegetable

  • Climbing (indeterminate)
  • Unusual lumpy fruit
  • Known as the 'Travelers Tomato'

Reisetomate Tomato is a climbing (indeterminate) variety. Known as the lumpy travelers tomato this unusual tomato forms clusters of joined tomato segments. Originating from Peru it was popular among travelers for its ability to be eaten by segment as required. Sweet acidic flavour with a thick skin. Great for chutney, salsa, salads and snacking.

Reisetomate  tomato have sections like an orange that may be hand pulled from the main bunch. I have seen similar anomalies in my pear and slicing tomatoes, but these were just one-offs that happened due to genetic hiccups in the development of the fruit. The Reisetomate tomato heirloom tomato fruits will all produce these highly clustered, yet single, tomatoes. If there is a genetic hiccup, it happened to the whole plant and not just the occasional fruit, which are borne 79 to 85 days from seeding. The flavour is sweet, yet sharp and acidic, but not bitter or too sour. It’s a lovely tomato to just eat out of hand as a snack or add to your favorite salad, providing bite sized little delights for the kitchen and lunch box.

Reisetomate means “travelers tomato” in German. Reisetomate tomato plants may bear the moniker because you can pull off a lobe and put the rest of the tomato in your pocket for later. Some sources state this tomato was originally cultivated by the Dutch or even the Austrians. The fruits also definitely have a resemblance to some used by the original denizens of Central America. We also have the claim that they are from ancient Peruvian cultivation. Whatever the genesis, this tomato is a visual oddity. It has the appearance of numerous cherry tomatoes all fused together in one glorious experiment. Each section of the tomato can be pulled apart without a knife. The globular fruit is a miracle of natural invention and gives guarantee that whoever made our world had a sense of humour.

When to Sow

Temperate Area: sow in early spring - either inside with extra bottom heat by using a bottom heat propagator, behind a sunny window or on top of a hot water system; if sowing outside wait until all frost danger has passed and the soil is warm. Generally, if starting tomato seeds inside then begin 6 to 8 weeks before the last expected frost date in your area. By sowing early there will be time for a good crop to be produced before the first frost in winter.

Subtropical Area: sow March - October in frost-free areas

Tropical Area: sow late April - July.

Hot & Humid Area: On extremely hot days tomatoes can literally 'cook' on the vine and turn to mush. Tomatoes also can suffer sunburn; a white shade cloth cover can help reduce heat stress on the plants. The hardiest tomatoes for hot and humid conditions are Cherry and Roma types. For a round tomato Tropic is a good choice as it is disease resistant.

Seed Sowing & Care

Sow 6 mm deep into seed raising mix in seedling pots or trays. Germination takes 7 - 14 days. Liquid feed the seedlings once germinated. Seedlings are ready to transplant when the 2nd set of 'true' leaves appear. During seedling development make sure the seedlings are not crowded and receive strong light. Seedlings become leggy (etiolated) with weak stems if the light is insufficient or if they are too crowded. The best seedlings have strong, stout stems.

Seedlings should be planted out in a full sun position after all frost danger has passed.

Plant in rows 90 cm apart with 45 - 60 cm between plants.

Transplant by planting seedlings deeper, up to the first set of 'true' leaves, first carefully removing the seed leaves. This speed up fruit production and increases root depth.

Grow in a fertile, well-drained garden bed with a soil pH 5.8 - 7. Prepare the soil by adding compost. If stakes are required, then put them at the same time as transplanting takes place to avoid later root disturbance. Providing support to keep fruit clear of the ground helps keep fruit clean and prevents slug and snail damage. Mulch the plants well. Keep well fertilized and evenly watered.

Fertilizer: Tomatoes are generally heavy feeders, requiring soil rich in organic matter and nutrients. Tomatoes planted in minimally fertile soils should be regularly fertilized to keep their N-P-K levels consistent. Excessive nitrogen produces fast green growth but inhibits fruiting. Keeping this in mind, choose a fertilizer that's low in nitrogen levels and higher in phosphorus and potassium. Examples of suitable N-P-K ratios for tomatoes include 8-32-16 and 6-24-24

Planting Guide

Method: Direct
Planting Depth: 5mm
Germination: 5 to 10 days at 21-27ºC
Life Cycle: Annual Frost Tender
Plant Height: Indeterminate
Row Spacing: 60-70cm
Plant Spacing: 50cm
Position: Full sun
Days to maturity/flowering: 80 to 85 days
Other: Plants need staking. Prune plants to two main stems. Keep well-watered. Pick when mature to encourage more fruit. To reduce the risk of disease do not water overhead. Rotate crops: do not plant in the same position two years in a row.
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